Thursday, 1 March 2012

Golem: One bit to rule them all

It was quite a long time ago I first heard LegionLabs talking about the one-bit processor he was designing.  It was one of those ideas that was either deep, or crazy.  Turns out it was deep.  It took my little brain a while to catch on, but eventually I was able to help out a bit.  We finally put together a write up on the Foulab site.

http://foulab.org/en/user/strawdog/Golem

The write up doesn't permit posting of comments, so go ahead and post em here.  Note the challenge - if you manage to write some code for this thing, we'd love to hear about it.

5 comments:

  1. So how loose is your definition of useful again, because I have a simple adding program almost finished. Btw, I think the idea definitely %100 deep, not crazy.. well maybe %70, %20, $40, D7. Let's suffice it to say that I like it.

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    1. The definition is pretty wide open - post it up, and drop on down to Foulab when you are in the Montreal area to collect that beer. We will be interested to see it.

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  2. I've been somewhat distracted by the 1-bit processor concept since reading about it on Hackaday and will probably build one with TTL just for the experience of it. I've built a JavaScript version of it with a 4-bit address and 4-bit operands (for simplicity). At the moment it only runs the counter program from 0 - 7 but I might build an interface into it so that other programs can be written and loaded.

    It can be found here: http://ttlcpu.com/articles/1-bit-cpu-4-bit-address

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  3. Glad you enjoyed it! The Javascript version looks great. The TTL CPU you are working on looks like a pretty cool project too. Over at Foulab we'd be very interested to see your build (either 4bit, or 1bit, or both). Bring it by if you are in the area.

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  4. Thanks, I'll definitely give you the heads up if/when I build the 1-bit processor and for sure next time I'm in Montreal. Ironically I was passing through on a connecting flight to Vancouver a few weeks before I first saw the Golem processor.

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